Old Ottawa South Community Association

  • Ottawa South History Project

Heritage Properties

A map to all the heritage properties in Old Ottawa South, linked to the Old Ottawa South History Project's write-up on each. Your own virtual historical walking tour of our neighbourhood.


 

Legend

  • blue pin = designated heritage property
  • red pin = significant heritage property
  • green pin = Heritage Survey 2009 property

Ottawa South Fire Station

Front (north) facade (Mohammad al-Asad, 2008)
Front (north) facade (Mohammad al-Asad, 2008)

260 Sunnyside Avenue
1921
Institutional

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The elaborate Spanish Revival style tells us at a glance that this building was designed by Werner Ernst Noffke (1878 – 1964), one of Ottawa’s best-known architects of the early 20th century. It is also the third-oldest surviving structure built as a fire station in the city. Its construction in 1921 reflected the southward growth of the city and came at a transitional time in the evolution of firefighting technology. As built, it accommodated both horse-drawn and motorized equipment, with the stables for the horses located underneath. Instead of the traditional hose drying tower, this fire hall had a hose drying room in the basement.

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Poaps House - 66 Barton St

Property

Title: 66 Barton Street

Address: 66 Barton Street (Lot 2, West Side Barton Avenue)

Introduction

The home at 66 Barton Street is a large, two-story, brick, cross-gable home built in 1897 By Jacob Vincent Poaps, an aspiring Ottawa merchant. It remained in the Poaps family throughout almost the entire twentieth century until 1987.

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Robertson House

Front (north) facade (Kathy Krywicki, 2008)
Front (north) facade (Kathy Krywicki, 2008)

32 Cameron Avenue
c. 1887
Residential

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This 1 1/2-storey brick veneer structure was built around 1887 in the then-rural area south of Ottawa. The pitched roof, double-gabled façade, ornate verge boards, and one-storey veranda with its extensive woodwork and central gable are all of architectural interest. The chinoiserie pattern of the railings reveals the handiwork of a proficient local carpenter, but many of the other decorative elements – ranging from the eight-pointed stars in the verge board to the dentils and spindles on the upper part of the veranda – were all manufactured by machine in local planning mills, and could be ordered from design books or catalogues. The L-plan of this house and the asymmetrical façade reflect the ultimate triumph of the romantic sensibility over the Georgian symmetry that had lingered in the Ottawa area.

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Southminster United Church

Main (east) facade (Kathy Krywicki, 2008)
Main (east) facade (Kathy Krywicki, 2008)

15 Aylmer Street (intersection of Aylmer Avenue and Bank Street)
1931
Religious

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Two congregations in Ottawa South, the Methodist and Presbyterian, united to build Southminster United Church in 1931 on the site of the former Methodist Church, which had been built in 1909 but torn down to make way for the new building.

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Sunnyside and Seneca Four Corners

Property

Title: The Corner of Sunnyside Avenue and Seneca Street

Address: 431, 435, 437 Sunnyside Avenue and 41, 43, and 44 Seneca Street, Ottawa, Ontario.

Introduction

The corner of Sunnyside Avenue and Seneca Street currently comprises four buildings which combine commercial and domestic spaces. In the early period of Old Ottawa South’s development (pre-1950) this corner had particular importance as one on which Ottawa’s streetcars turned. It has continuously included commercial spaces since 1907.

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Williams House

Northern facade facing Southern Drive (Kathy Krywicki, 2008)
Northern facade facing Southern Drive (Kathy Krywicki, 2008)

96 Southern Drive
1820s and later
Residential

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An 1827 map of the vicinity around the still-new settlement of Bytown shows the residence of Lewis Williams on this site, across the Rideau River from the house of Braddish Billings. The map is on display at the Billings Estate Museum. On this basis, it is believed that the original portion of this frame structure dates from 1827, placing it among the oldest frame buildings in Ottawa. Williams and his family were among the first settlers of the region, arriving in 1817.

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