Old Ottawa South Community Association

  • Ottawa South History Project

Ottawa South History Project

We are a group of local amateur historians whose interest is to research, document, and present facts and information about the history of Old Ottawa South in a fun and informative way.

In this section

Heritage Properties

A map to all the heritage properties in Old Ottawa South, linked to the Old Ottawa South History Project's write-up on each. Your own virtual historical walking tour of our neighbourhood.


Legend

  • blue pin = designated heritage property
  • red pin = significant heritage property
  • green pin = Heritage Survey 2009 property
View items...

Long reads

Essays and reflections on the History of Old Ottawa South View items...

Stories

These are glimpses of Old Ottawa South's history: reproduced snippets of news items and notices describing the old, as if it were new. View items...

Ottawa South Fire Station

Front (north) facade (Mohammad al-Asad, 2008) 260 Sunnyside Avenue1921Institutional View additional images of building. The elaborate Spanish Revival style tells us at a glance that this building was designed by Werner Ernst Noffke (1878 – 1964), one of Ottawa’s best-known architects of the early 20th century. It is also the third-oldest surviving structure built as a fire station in the city. Its construction in 1921 reflected the southward growth of the city and came at a transitional time in the evolution of firefighting technology. As built, it accommodated both horse-drawn and motorized equipment, with the stables for the horses located underneath. Instead of the traditional hose drying tower, this fire hall had a hose drying room in the basement.
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Marion House

Front (south) facade facing Sunnyside Avenue (Kathy Krywicki, 2010) 131 Sunnyside Avenue1912Residential View addtional image of building. The two-story Marion House sits at the northwest corner of Sunnyside and Bristol. It was bordered from the north by a number of market gardens that were part of the original Williams farm before development took over the nearby area along Southern Drive and Avenue Road.
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Hunt House

Front (south) facade facing Hopewell Avenue (Kathy Krywicki, 2008) 149 Hopewell Avenue1898Residential View additional images of building. This 2 1/2-storey, front-gabled frame structure was built in 1898 for Benjamin J. Hunt, a pressman. The well-preserved clapboard finish is highlighted by a solid verge board. The modest trellis work on the front façade and at a side entry differ from the more exuberant gingerbread produced in the late-Victorian era.
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Echo Bank House

View of driveway leading to house entrance (Kathy Krywicki, 2008) 700 Echo Drivec. 1865Residential View additional images of building. This 2 1/2 storey stone house represents a transition from stolid Georgian symmetry to a more Romantic sensibility in the Ottawa area. It was built for Colonel George Hay, a prominent hardware merchant and president of the Bank of Ottawa. Tradition has it that, while serving as one of the city’s first aldermen, Hay suggested that Bytown be renamed Ottawa. Further, it was in this very house that Hay is said to have designed the city’s first coat of arms.
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Poaps House - 66 Barton St

Property Title: 66 Barton Street Address: 66 Barton Street (Lot 2, West Side Barton Avenue) Introduction The home at 66 Barton Street is a large, two-story, brick, cross-gable home built in 1897 By Jacob Vincent Poaps, an aspiring Ottawa merchant. It remained in the Poaps family throughout almost the entire twentieth century until 1987.
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Cuthbertson House - 706 Echo Dr

Property Title: 706 Echo Drive Address: 706 Echo Drive (Lot 10 Echo Drive, part of lot K, concession C, Nepean Township) Introduction The house built on lot 10 on the subdivision of part of Lot K, concession C, Nepean Township is a large brick home with a two-story front bay window situated on a large lot with mature trees and a shed. It was built in 1912 at the request of the contractor James Cuthbertson. It has been home to many notable figures in the Ottawa Community.
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Sunnyside and Seneca Four Corners

Property Title: The Corner of Sunnyside Avenue and Seneca Street Address: 431, 435, 437 Sunnyside Avenue and 41, 43, and 44 Seneca Street, Ottawa, Ontario. Introduction The corner of Sunnyside Avenue and Seneca Street currently comprises four buildings which combine commercial and domestic spaces. In the early period of Old Ottawa South’s development (pre-1950) this corner had particular importance as one on which Ottawa’s streetcars turned. It has continuously included commercial spaces since 1907.
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613-247-4946