Old Ottawa South Community Association

Memories of Sunnyside in the Thirties

When my parents moved from Grove to Sunnyside Avenue in 1930, I was seven years old. Our new home was built about 1912. It had a big verandah to play on, a balcony, real wood shutters, and a large wood stove in the kitchen. There were enough rooms so we three children each had one of our own. Dad had a study plus a garden full of perennials — what more could an Englishman want?


From the Archives: Tells About Conditions in Ottawa South in 1909

Old Time Stuff, by Earl G. Wilson, was a regular feature of the Ottawa Citizen for many years. This O.T.S. article transcribed here is from the Ottawa Citizen June 16, 1939.

Tells About Conditions In Ottawa South Back in 1909

Some of the people presently residing in that thickly populated section of Ottawa South west of the Bank street, between Sunnyside and Cameron, will hardly credit the statement that thirty years ago a road ran across country from the corner of Sunnyside and Seneca to Billings Bridge. This interesting fact is divulged by Mr. William Kippen, who has resided on Seneca street, near the corner of Sunnyside since 1909.


Our Community 100 Years Ago: A Sketch of Old Ottawa South in 1911

LAC_Woodside_PA-016818_smallWhat was happening in our part of the City around 1911? Who lived here? What were they concerned about? What local institutions were active?

As we celebrate the start of 2011, a look back at people, places and events of a century ago will give us a broader view of our progress.

Let’s start with “who”. The 1911 Census says 1,485 people were living in Ottawa South. There were 314 households, consisting of 280 married couples, 40 widows, and 20 widowers (but no divorcees). By comparison, Ottawa as a whole had a population of 90,520.


From the Archives: Railway Tracks Going Under Canal

Now used by the Ottawa O-Train,  the decision fifty years ago to eliminate level crossings along the rail line, thereby constructing a tunnel under Dow’s Lake to replace the level railway bridge, changed the face of the western part of town. Here from the Ottawa Citizen article 13 June 1961, the announcement of the planned work.

Railway Tracks Going Under Canal; Begin Work in Fall; Finish 2 Years

The government has approved the depression of the CPR Prescott railway line across the city’s West End.

Expected to start in the fall, the $3,600,000 project will see the line go under the Rideau Canal by tunnel and by open cut from the canal to near Gladstone Avenue.

Not a level railway crossing will be left in the section concerned.

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