Old Ottawa South Community Association

  • Ottawa South History Project

Planning Primer Heritage Elective

The Planning, Infrastructure, and Economic Development Department offers the Planning Primer Program to help residents become more aware of, and more involved in, the land-use planning process.  The program is a series of free, half-day courses. 

You can register for the Planning Primer Heritage Elective course until November 17, 2017. Seating is limited to 40 residents per session.

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Hopewell Avenue Public School

South facade of old building facing Hopewell Avenue (Mohammad al-Asad, 2008)

17 Hopewell Avenue
1910 and later
Educational

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The first school on the present Hopewell Avenue Public School site dates back to the 1830s or 1840s. It was a one-room log building with a few windows, a small door, and a wood stove. By the end of the 1870s, this was replaced by a brick building with semi-circular arched windows and doors, as well buff-colored brick at the corners to give the impression of rusticated stone. This newer building had two small classrooms and was heated by stoves connected by long pipes that ended at the building’s chimney.

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Bank Street Bridge

South part (Mohammad al-Asad, 2008)

South part (Mohammad al-Asad, 2008)

North part (Mohammad al-Asad, 2008)

North part (Mohammad al-Asad, 2008)

1912;* restored in 1993
Infrastructure

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The Bank Street Canal Bridge carries Bank Street along a roughly north – south direction over the Rideau Canal, linking The Glebe to Old Ottawa South. It also passes over Queen Elizabeth and Colonel By drives, each of which extends along one side of the canal.

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Robertson House

Front (north) facade (Kathy Krywicki, 2008)
Front (north) facade (Kathy Krywicki, 2008)

32 Cameron Avenue
c. 1887
Residential

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This 1 1/2-storey brick veneer structure was built around 1887 in the then-rural area south of Ottawa. The pitched roof, double-gabled façade, ornate verge boards, and one-storey veranda with its extensive woodwork and central gable are all of architectural interest. The chinoiserie pattern of the railings reveals the handiwork of a proficient local carpenter, but many of the other decorative elements – ranging from the eight-pointed stars in the verge board to the dentils and spindles on the upper part of the veranda – were all manufactured by machine in local planning mills, and could be ordered from design books or catalogues. The L-plan of this house and the asymmetrical façade reflect the ultimate triumph of the romantic sensibility over the Georgian symmetry that had lingered in the Ottawa area.

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Evans House - 175 Belmont Ave

Property

Title: 175 Belmont Avenue

Address: 175 Belmont Avenue (Lot 17, north side of Belmont Avenue)

Introduction

The house located at 175 Belmont Avenue in Ottawa, Ontario was constructed in 1898 by Elizabeth Evans, a widow with several children the oldest of which, Grace Evans, was a co-owner. It is a large 2 ½ story brick-veneered frame house with a side hall plan, front-facing gable, and pitched roof. It functioned as a rental property for the Evans family until Grace Evans’s death in 1965. The house is typical of middle class homes at the turn of the twentieth century. 1 At the time of its construction, a sister duplex was built for Elizabeth Evans at 183 Belmont which also functioned as a rental property providing income for the Evans family.

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Reflecting on Old Ottawa South’s Built Environment, Past and Present

Reflecting on Old Ottawa South’s Built Environment, Past and Present
Mohammad al-Asad
September 2008

Abstract:
This essay provides both documentary information as well as reflections on the architectural and urban characteristics of Old Ottawa South. It addresses the neighborhood’s past evolution, present characteristics, as well as possible future trends. It discusses possible scenarios that allow for increased densification in Old Ottawa South while preserving, and even enhancing, the urban and architectural qualities that contribute to making the neighborhood a positive example of urban living.

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Publications: Exploring the Built Heritage of Old Ottawa South

The Ottawa South History Project is pleased to announce the publication of Exploring the Built Heritage of Ottawa South.book jacket

Published in partnership with Heritage Ottawa, the book encompasses an overview of the history of Old Ottawa South and presents the designated heritage properties in the neighbourhood, along with the property profiles and streetscapes developed in the summer of 2009.

Online sales are available through Heritage Ottawa. The book is also available in selected local bookstores such as Octopus Books in the Glebe, Books on Beechwood in New Edinburgh, Perfect Books in Centretown, and Black Squirrel Books in Old Ottawa South.

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613-247-4946