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Old Ottawa South Community Association

  • Ottawa South History Project

Heritage Properties Map

Legend

  • blue pin = designated heritage property
  • red pin = significant heritage property
  • green pin = Heritage Survey 2009 property
Photo by Nolan Cipriano.

Cuthbertson House - 706 Echo Dr

Property

Title: 706 Echo Drive

Address: 706 Echo Drive (Lot 10 Echo Drive, part of lot K, concession C, Nepean Township)

Introduction

The house built on lot 10 on the subdivision of part of Lot K, concession C, Nepean Township is a large brick home with a two-story front bay window situated on a large lot with mature trees and a shed. It was built in 1912 at the request of the contractor James Cuthbertson. It has been home to many notable figures in the Ottawa Community.

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Sunnyside and Seneca Four Corners

Property

Title: The Corner of Sunnyside Avenue and Seneca Street

Address: 431, 435, 437 Sunnyside Avenue and 41, 43, and 44 Seneca Street, Ottawa, Ontario.

Introduction

The corner of Sunnyside Avenue and Seneca Street currently comprises four buildings which combine commercial and domestic spaces. In the early period of Old Ottawa South’s development (pre-1950) this corner had particular importance as one on which Ottawa’s streetcars turned. It has continuously included commercial spaces since 1907.

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Evans House - 175 Belmont Ave

Property

Title: 175 Belmont Avenue

Address: 175 Belmont Avenue (Lot 17, north side of Belmont Avenue)

Introduction

The house located at 175 Belmont Avenue in Ottawa, Ontario was constructed in 1898 by Elizabeth Evans, a widow with several children the oldest of which, Grace Evans, was a co-owner. It is a large 2 ½ story brick-veneered frame house with a side hall plan, front-facing gable, and pitched roof. It functioned as a rental property for the Evans family until Grace Evans’s death in 1965. The house is typical of middle class homes at the turn of the twentieth century. 1 At the time of its construction, a sister duplex was built for Elizabeth Evans at 183 Belmont which also functioned as a rental property providing income for the Evans family.

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Belmont Avenue South Side

Property

Title: South Side Belmont Avenue Between Willard Street and Bellwood Street.

Address: 170, 172, 174, 176, 178, 180, 182, 184, 190 Belmont Avenue, Ottawa, Ontario.

Introduction

The block located between Willard and Bellwood Avenues in Old Ottawa South comprises a series of homes built between 1916 and 1930. All of the lots feature 1920s Prairie Style architecture, and are situated on intensely developed urban building lots. This street represents development in Old Ottawa South in the 1920s and the transition of the neighbourhood from a suburban to urban space.

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Gorman House - 38 Euclid Ave

Property

Title: 38 Euclid Avenue

Address: 38 Euclid Avenue (Lot 6, south side of Euclid Avenue)

Introduction

The house located at 38 Euclid Avenue was constructed in 1896-7 by Mary Gorman, a widow with six children. It is a modest, wood- framed and –clad house based on a side hall plan with a pitched roof and a front-facing gable end. The property remained in the ownership of Gorman’s descendents until 1971, serving as the childhood home of hockey player and entrepreneur, Tommy Gorman, from 1896 to c. 1908.1

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Photo by Kathy Krywicki.

Jarman House - 834 Colonel By Dr

Property

Title: 834 Colonel By Drive

Address: 834 Colonel By Drive (Plan 214 Lot 5 E Part lot 3.)

Introduction

The home located at 834 Colonel By Drive was built in 1908 by Frank Jarman, an art dealer.1 Beginning from the time of its construction, it has been home to many prominent residents of Old Ottawa South, including Frank Jarman, a framer and art dealer, an intellectual property lawyer, and John Gleeson a manufacturer. It is a brick building based on a centre hall plan, and notable for being architect designed, making intentional use of classical architectural vocabulary, and for being a superior example of early twentieth-century Edwardian Classicism.

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Reflecting on Old Ottawa South’s Built Environment, Past and Present

Reflecting on Old Ottawa South’s Built Environment, Past and Present
Mohammad al-Asad
September 2008

Abstract:
This essay provides both documentary information as well as reflections on the architectural and urban characteristics of Old Ottawa South. It addresses the neighborhood’s past evolution, present characteristics, as well as possible future trends. It discusses possible scenarios that allow for increased densification in Old Ottawa South while preserving, and even enhancing, the urban and architectural qualities that contribute to making the neighborhood a positive example of urban living.

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How a Tennis Club Found and Kept a Home Against All Odds

Free Heritage Ottawa Lecture about the Ottawa Tennis & Lawn Bowling Club

OTLBC-8857743-sThe Ottawa Tennis & Lawn Bowling Club (OTLBC) has been part of the Ottawa South neighbourhood since 1922 when the club purchased a 5-acre site on Cameron Avenue along the Rideau River, in an area then known as Ottawa South Playgrounds. George A. Crain & Sons constructed 2-storey clubhouse in August 1922, with the official opening in June 1923.

This lecture, by writer Janet Uren and architect Kris Benes, is a chance to learn more about the club's past and restoration plans for the future.

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Publications: Exploring the Built Heritage of Old Ottawa South

The Ottawa South History Project is pleased to announce the publication of Exploring the Built Heritage of Ottawa South.book jacket

Published in partnership with Heritage Ottawa, the book encompasses an overview of the history of Old Ottawa South and presents the designated heritage properties in the neighbourhood, along with the property profiles and streetscapes developed in the summer of 2009.

Online sales are available through Heritage Ottawa. The book is also available in selected local bookstores such as Octopus Books in the Glebe, Books on Beechwood in New Edinburgh, Perfect Books in Centretown, and Black Squirrel Books in Old Ottawa South.

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Story’s Story

698-Echo-Drive-smallThe stately house at 698 Echo Drive has a very significant history that relates to both the City of Ottawa and the Old Ottawa South neighbourhood. For most of the 20th century, it was associated with the owners of the Story Lumber Company, the Doran Construction Company and the Coulter Pharmacies Company.

In the 19th century, George Hay, a Sparks Street hardware store owner who eventually became the President of the Bank of Ottawa, owned most of the triangular-shaped block on Echo Drive between Riverdale Avenue and Bank Street. Upon his death in 1910, his estate was sub-divided into 23 huge lots by S.E. Farley, Ontario land surveyor. The first lot to be purchased in 1912, the one immediately east of his home at 700 Echo Drive was by John A. Story, a well-known lumber merchant.

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